Posts Tagged ‘Astoria Riverwalk’

Astoria OR Riverwalk has History Ships Shops & Views

June 5th, 2018 by Clementines B&B

The best way to see the Columbia River waterfront in Astoria is to walk or bike along the Astoria Riverwalk, also known as the Astoria River Trail. The Riverwalk hugs the bank of the river, providing visitors with great views, a trip through Astoria’s history, and access to many museums and attractions nearby.

red and white ship in river seen from riverwalk framed by tree branches by Michelle Roth PhotographyIt follows the route of Astoria & Columbia River Railroad, begun in 1898. In the 1990s, Astoria transformed these abandoned railroad tracks into the first section of the Riverwalk through the National Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. Today, it stretches just over six miles from Smith Point and Port of Astoria on Young’s Bay to Tongue Point. The trail is flat and paved except for a few boardwalk sections. Visitors can access the trail almost anywhere along its length. The Traillink website has a map and detailed information about the trail.

The Riverwalk begins at the Port of Astoria, passing through this industrial area with its great variety of ships, to a viewpoint of the historic Astoria-Megler Bridge. Under the Bridge, the Maritime Memorial Park offers more views of the river and its ship traffic. The Park honors members of the U.S. Coast Guard who died during service on the Columbia River and residents who have worked in the maritime industry.

Columbia River viewing tower with brown wooden railings, green tower, &  red roof by Michelle Roth PhotographyThe Riverwalk passes historic cannery buildings and wharves, and at 6th Street, visitors can stop at the viewing platform to enjoy more ship traffic and scenic vistas along the river. The trail passes through the riverfront area of downtown Astoria. Here, most of the old buildings have been converted to shops, galleries, restaurants and brewpubs for visitors to explore.

Many Astoria attractions and museums are just a short walk from the downtown section of the Riverwalk. The Oregon Film Museum, a Goonies favorite, and the historic Captain George Flavel House are only three blocks away. Farther along the downtown portion of the trail, the Garden of the Surging Waves and the Museum of Whimsy are within an easy walking distance as well. At the eastern edge of downtown, the trail passes the nationally famous Columbia River Maritime Museum.

Visitors who enjoy watching wildlife will enjoy the eastern section of the Riverwalk, beginning at the Maritime Museum. This section features more natural habitat. Birders may spot heron and bald eagles, and tens of thousands of birds gather along the shoreline during their fall migration.

two white and red ships on water evergreen forested mountains in background by Michelle Roth PhotographyThe Riverwalk continues past the Millpond to 36th Street. There, visitors are likely to hear the barking of sea lions as they sunbathe around the docks. The trail branches at its eastern end, with one branch providing access to LaPlante Park. The other leads toward the lagoons, ending at Lagoon Road near Tongue Point.

The Riverwalk and the route of Astoria’s Riverfront Trolley parallel each other from near the Piers at Smith Point to 30th Street, just past the Mill Pond. Visitors who want to stroll shorter portions of the trail can ride the Trolley on other sections if they wish.

Spring has arrived in the Pacific Northwest, so don’t wait to book a weekend getaway to Astoria! The Riverwalk showcases Astoria’s maritime history together with its culture, shopping, and lively restaurant scene. Best of all, when you stay at Clementine’s Bed & Breakfast, access to the downtown portion of the Riverwalk is just three blocks away. Spring has arrived, so give us a call and book your stay!

Photos by Michelle Roth Photography courtesy of Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce

Astoria Riverfront Trolley: Historic Waterfront Tour

April 10th, 2018 by Clementines B&B

Ride the Astoria Riverfront Trolley to see city landmarks and learn about Astoria’s history from the Trolley’s conductors. Visitors can ride a three mile route along the Columbia Riverfront from Uniontown in the west to the foot of 39th Street. The fare to ride “Old 300,” the restored 1913 streetcar, is just $1. An all-day hop on/hop off fare is just $2 – one of the best bargains in Astoria. The Trolley’s nine convenient stops include the Maritime Memorial Park, Columbia River viewing platform, Columbia Maritime Museum, and The Uppertown Firefighters Museum.

Red, cream and green Astoria Riverfront Trolley on tracks with conductor in open doorwayThe historic Uniontown area includes over a hundred historically significant buildings typical of late 19th- and early 20th-century architectural styles, including Italianate, Queen Anne, Stick Style, and Craftsman. Ahead on the Trolley’s route is the famous Astoria-Megler Bridge, joining Oregon and Washington. Under the Bridge, Maritime Memorial Park honors members of the U.S. Coast Guard and local residents lost at sea, together with the region’s seafaring heritage.

A small park and dock at the 6th Street stop offers a viewing platform where visitors can watch the ship traffic along the river. Another small riverfront park at 14th Street marks the historic landing for Car Ferry No. 2, the only way to reach the state of Washington until the Bridge replaced the ferry in 1966. Around 13th and 14th Streets, the Trolley passes through the part of the city destroyed in Astoria’s two great fires in 1883 and 1922.

backs of man in blue jacket and boy sitting on wooden seat inside 1913 trolley with curved wood paneled ceilingAt 17th Street, the Trolley stops at the nationally-known Columbia River Maritime Museum; the Heritage Museum, with its regional historical exhibits, is nearby as well.

Past the Mill Pond, the Trolley stops again at 30th Street. Nearby, the Uppertown Firefighters Museum exhibits antique firefighting equipment, including hand-pulled and horse-drawn vehicles, plus historic photos of the 1922 fire.

Visitors hear the clang, clang, clang of the Trolley throughout the late spring and summer months. It’s fun to just take the hour-long ride, but even better is to use it to see some of the many Astoria attractions along its riverside route. The Old 300 website includes detailed information about the landmarks along the route as well as the Trolley’s history and schedule.

When you’re staying with us at Clementine’s Bed & Breakfast on Exchange Street, the closest Trolley stops are at the foot of 6th Street and 11th Street. Either stop is just a six or seven minute walk from the bed and breakfast. The Trolley has just begun its 2018 season, so it’s time to give us a call or go online and book your spring getaway now!

2018 Schedule
April 13 to May 6, 2018: 12:00 – 6:00 pm Friday, Saturday and Sunday only
May 11 to September 4, 2018: 12:00 – 6:00 pm Daily
NOTE: The Trolley does not run when it’s raining.

Photos courtesy of Astoria Warrenton Area Chamber of Commerce